Docker & Kubernetes Part 1

Containerization is taking over the world, and we owe it all to LXC... oops, I mean Docker (heh heh heh). Anyways, moving on. With the Docker Engine comes the ability to create containers. Containers are processes (not VM’s) running to spin up your application in a bite-sized environment (still not a VM). With containers, they allow you to use a host(s) to spin up and manage multiple applications (have I mentioned they are not VM’s?). As you have may heard, Docker/containerization is not a virtualization platform. Containers are more processes/images then they are actual hosts. Docker is the engine and what allows you to spin up your environment. Containers are thee environment. Now, this is all fine and dand, but how about if you want multiple environments? 10 of your application running? Or 50? That’s where K8 (Kubernetes) comes in. Today, we will be installing both for Mac.  The first thing you want to do is visit the Docker Community site. There are two forms of Docker. Community edition and enterprise edition. Community edition is just fine for what we’re doing. Head over to this site and create a free account. Once you’re down, come on back to this post: https://store.docker.com/editions/community/docker-ce-desktop-mac

Once you sign in, you will see a download button.

Once you sign in, you will see a download button.

Once you click that, you will see a DMG downloading.

Once that is complete, open up that bad boy and work out your index finger by clicking next a bunch of tines. The, you will get a cute mascott on your top taskbar called the Docker Whale 🙂

Then, you’ll want to go ahead and open up Docker. You will see several options, but you want to click Preferences. Then head over to the Kubernetes section and enable Kubernetes.

That’s it! Crazy, right? On Part 2 we will be running Kubernetes and seeing it go up and spin up multiple environments.

Docker & Kubernetes Part 1
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